How To Help Aging Parents With Their Medications

While some significant life changes, like becoming a parent or getting married, have a precise starting point, other changes happen gradually. Little by little, the seniors in our family may encounter a variety of limitations. Knowing when or how much to step into your aging loved one’s medical routine can be hard to pinpoint, but once identified, there are many ways we, as younger family members, can be of assistance. Thankfully, with some planning, organization, and tools, we can help our aging family members better manage their medications with some planning, organization, and tools.





Becoming informed gives peace of mind.

The whole story lets us know how much we need to get involved and what tools we might need.

This can take many forms:

Familiarizing ourselves

It can be as simple as paying attention to changes in their weight, daily habits, or physical abilities.

Opening a loving conversation, even by ph


one, is a perfectly natural way to gain insight into how they feel and get along in their day-to-day life, especially if we don’t live nearby.

However, older generations often don’t want to be made to feel like they are a big deal and may say they are fine. Later, though, they might reveal a contradicting story with their body language or tone.

Understanding what ailments are affecting our loved ones

It equips us with an accurate perspective of the present treatment while allowing us to prepare for the next steps.

Most importantly, knowing what someone is going through gives us a heart of compassion and opportunities to bond emotionally.

Staying on top of medications is vital.

Medication management can cause so much stress and anxiety. Often, it’s the main reason family members begin to get involved in their loved one’s care regimen.

Some of the concerns we have as caring family members:

● Poor eyesight can make different pills look similar.

● Medication names and purposes are complicated to remember.

● Forgetfulness, distractibility, or confusion caused by memory impairment or dementia can cause a person to skip their dosages or take other pills, which puts their health at risk.

● Some foods can adversely interact with medications.

● Aching joints and muscle loss can make opening pill bottles challenging.

Regarding meds, there is little to no room for


mistakes.

Here are some helpful tools:

This easy-to-use tool solves several problems many older adults with low-vision and arthritis face.

First, opening safety lids on almost any medication bottle is challenging. Its soft TPR rubber gives the user a better grip so they can open them w


ith ease.

The LED light and magnifying lens help patients with sight problems read dosing instructions and small print more clearly. Mistakes are less likely to happen if they can easily read the names and education on the pill bottles themselves. Buy on Amazon or visit the Remedic Website to learn more.

This easy-to-use tool solves several problems many older adults with low-vision and arthritis face.

First, it is challenging to open safety lids on almost any medication bottle. Its soft TPR rubber gives the user a better grip so they can open them with ease.

The LED light and magnifying lens help patients with sight problems read dosing instructions and small print more clearly. Mistakes are less likely to happen if they can easily read the names and education on the pill bottles themselves.

Make a list, chart, table, or template.

This is a great way to track who, what, and when. It’s also an excellent opportunity to learn about your loved one’s medication routine.

● Include their name.

● Medication name, medication type, and perhaps what its role is (i.e., Bumex, diuretic, for body fluid/blood pressure management)

● What time or times of day to take it (i.e., two times per day, morning and evening)

● Amount (i.e., ½ pill at a time)

● Specify if it needs to be taken with a meal

● List any vitamins or supplements.

● List any food or beverages that need to be avoided.

● Include refill dates if applicable.

You can create these charts yourself or explore some free options online.


Pill Organizers

Traditional pill organizers are sectioned off for each day of the week. Some even have AM and PM areas for each day.

Some people run into, especially those with sight or memory impairment because pills get distributed incorrectly. It is also common for people to mix their days up.

One way to address these issues is to use pill organizers in combination with schedules, charts, alarms, or reminder apps. After all, it is just one more fantastic tool in our caretaking toolbox.

Another way to address pill organizing problems is to explore some electronic pill organizer products on the market. These can range in price from $50 to well over $500.

You could also try a service called PillPack. They mail sorted and well-labeled medication baggies that are dispensed daily. Although Medicare does not cover these products or services, you might find the safety features worth their weight in gold.


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